Discovering Your “True Self” in Christ

Daniel Bush Uncategorized

This post was first published officially on the LogosTalk blog: https://blog.logos.com/2017/02/discovering-true-self-christ/.

Reading a Daniel Bush book is always a delight! —Steve Brown

Discover the beautiful truth that Steve Brown and so many others have found at the core of Daniel Bush’s writing. His new book, Undefended, is born from Bush’s personal experiences as a pastor and counselor and all the difficulties and challenges that he faced in those ministries. Writing from a Gospel-centered and grace-driven perspective, he draws on stories from the Bible, history, and his own life to help bring spiritual awakening to the reader’s own life.

Here’s the rest of Steve Brown’s endorsement of this new title:

Undefended is incredibly refreshing and profound—and so practical. Here, you will find real-life ‘hard places’ and the good news that Jesus shows. This is a book that could change your life.

—Steve Brown, radio broadcaster/founder of Key Life Network and author of Hidden Agendas and Three Free Sins

An Authentic Spiritual Awakening

In Undefended, Bush explores our connection to our true identity in Christ and how that relationship shapes how we react to the difficult seasons in life. Below, Bush shows us what our “true self” and “false self” looks like from Christ’s perspective:

So much goes awry in the Christian community and in the lives of Christians when spiritual growth and maturity is equated with perfection. Perfection is the furthest thing from maturity—first of all, because it’s an attribute of God alone, and second, since perfection implies the absence of need, a perfect being wouldn’t need God. Neediness is an essential attribute of being truly human—and without it, you would be separated from connection with God. Spiritual maturity is, therefore, not perfection, but the unique amalgamation of authenticity and need. It’s seeing yourself and God rightly, as well as seeing and living out of that connection in every area, attitude, and action. This is becoming truly human: Finding your true self in Christ, who is Immanuel (“God with us”)—divine love in its outward expression.

By contrast, the “false self”. . . is when you exist without conscious mindfulness of and trust in Christ. It’s looking at your own mechanisms, accomplishments, abilities, and prowess—what you can produce—or looking at what others can provide and produce for you, as the basis and substance of your existence. You put on a mask and play a part in order to obtain what you think you need from others.

In this book, the true self is the person you are when your identity and dignity derive exclusively from who Jesus is. Your false self is how you think about and present yourself to the world (or hide from it through debilitating self-monitoring or downright seclusion) when you function apart from the one crucial connection of human existence: the conscious actualization of God in real time. Humanity is not divinity. Humanity is inherently being in need—the creaturely need of continual connection to the Creator.

This post was first published officially on the LogosTalk blog: https://blog.logos.com/2017/02/discovering-true-self-christ/.